Chloroprene Compounds

Common Name: Neoprene®, CR
Chemical Name: Polychloroprene
ASTM D1418 Designation: CR

General Characteristics

Hardness Range (Shore A): 50-90
Tensile Strength Range (psi): 500-3000
Elongation (Max %): 600
Compression Set: Good
Resilience-Rebound: Excellent
Abrasion Resistance: Excellent
Tear Resistance: Good
Solvent Resistance: Fair
Oil Resistance: Fair
Low Temperature: +10°F to -50°F
High Temperature: 212°F/250°F intermittent
Aging, Weathering-Sunlight: Good

Advantages

  • High resilience with low compression set.
  • Flame resistance.
  • Animal and vegetable oil resistance.
  • Not affected by moderate chemical, fats, greases and many oils and solvents.
  • Weather, ozone and oxidation resistant.

Disadvantages

  • Not recommended for use with strong oxidizing acids, polar sovents (acetones, esters, keytones), chlorinated, aromatic and nitro hydrocarbons.
  • Not recommended for dynamic applications with low temperatures. Neoprenes can crystallize while under stress at low temperatures, however, it’s usually Ok in static applications at low temperatures.

Neoprene® is the common name for polychloroprene elastomers. polychloroprene was the first commercially manufactured synthetic rubber.

Polychloroprene exhibits good abrasion, chemical, flex, heat, oil, weather and ozone resistance. It good in dynamic applications because of its toughness. It’s commonly used for O-rings, seals, hoses, wire and cable jacketing, coated fabrics, wet suits, shoes. It’s used in the automotive industry in power transmission and timing belts; water, oil and air hoses; drive train boots, air springs and engine mounts. Except for low temperature resistance, polychloroprene is almost as versatile as natural rubber.

In the early 1990’s, blue colored polychloroprene was used by Harrison Radiator Corporation, Division of GM, in its automotive air conditioning systems that utilized R134A refrigerants.

Neoprene® is a registered trademarks of DuPont Dow Elastomers.

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